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Health + Tech Perspective : Access to Symptoms > Better Algorithms
  Here’s a dangerous meme that I keep running into: “A doctor’s job is basically to look at symptoms, make a diagnosis, then prescribe treatment. Medicine is just a big decision tree — ripe for optimization and automation.” Of course, it’s mostly my friends in tech saying these... Read more
Deep(ly) Unsettling: The ubiquitous, unspoken business model of AI-induced mental illness
“The junk merchant,” wrote William S. Burroughs, “doesn’t sell his product to the consumer, he sells the consumer to his product. He does not improve and simplify his merchandise. He degrades and simplifies the client.” He might as well have been describing the commercial, AI-mediated, social-network-driven... Read more
Accuracy of Deep Learning… using ultra–wide-field fundus ophthalmoscopy for detecting rhegmatogenous retinal detachment
Editor’s note:  Additional authors and contributors of this research in the acknowledgements. Abstract Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is a serious condition that can lead to blindness; however, it is highly treatable with timely and appropriate treatment. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of RRD is crucial. In... Read more
Five Best Practices in Healthcare Propensity Modeling
Editors note: This is the first post in a two-part series that discusses healthcare predictive and propensity modeling and selecting the optimal analytics partner to support your growth and engagement efforts. The second post in this series will share five critical predictive modeling questions to ask a prospective... Read more
Aedin Culhane on Big Genetic Data, and the Bioconductor Project
The following Q&A is part of a series of interviews conducted with speakers at the 2017 ODSC East conference in Boston. This interview is with Aedin Culhane, Computational Biologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institue, whose talk was entitled “R and Bioconductor in Cancer Research –  Big... Read more
Actuaries are bringing Netflix-like predictive modeling to health care
I’m an actuary. That means I use numbers to try to understand human behavior, manage risk, and evaluate the likelihood that a particular thing will happen in the future. Most people associate my work with green eyeshades and the morbid business of predicting how long someone... Read more